The Curious World of Soviet Bus Stops

When you see his photos, you can understand why Christopher Herwig spent 12 years traveling through the former Soviet Union, taking pictures of Soviet-era bus stops.

Photographer Christopher Herwig first discovered the unusual architecture of Soviet-era bus stops during a 2002 long-distance bike ride from London to St. Petersburg. Challenging himself to take one good photograph every hour, Herwig began to notice surprisingly designed bus stops on otherwise deserted stretches of road.

Twelve years later, Herwig had covered more than 18,000 miles in 14 countries of the former Soviet Union, traveling by car, bike, bus and taxi to hunt down and document these bus stops. Eventually Herwig had so many images that he decided to turn them into a book called Soviet Bus Stops.

In the book Armen Sardarov, a Belarusian architect, author, and designer of close to 100 bus stops, explains that in the stagnant middle years of the Cold War in the Soviet Union, ‘Ideology regulated all spheres of life, including architecture and art,’ adding that it was ‘practically

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